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Alan Kinlaw Research Group

Alan Kinlaw, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy. He received pre-doctoral funding support from the University of North Carolina and Aarhus University in Denmark, and post-doctoral funding support from the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research. Outside of DPOP, he collaborates extensively with students, post-docs, fellows, and faculty in the UNC School of Public Health, UNC School of Medicine, the North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences (NC TraCS) Institute, and the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research. He teaches the Epidemiologic Research with Healthcare Databases course, and enjoys teaching and mentoring graduate students and fellows who wish to gain experience in epidemiologic research.

Alan’s research focuses generally on pharmaco-epidemiology and health services research that leverages large and high-dimensional secondary data, including healthcare claims data, clinical registry data, and electronic health records. He studies utilization patterns and comparative effectiveness and safety of prescription drugs, vaccines, medical devices, and surgical procedures.

 

Substantively, Kinlaw’s research focuses primarily on the issue of antibiotic stewardship, in both the pediatric and adult population. Reducing unnecessary and excessive prescription of antibiotics could curb the frequency and extent of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, reduce incidence of other unintended adverse effects of antibiotics, and decrease unnecessary financial expenditures for antibiotics and acute clinical consultation. His ongoing work in antibiotic stewardship includes analysis of electronic health records to: identify guideline-discordant prescribing of antibiotics; examine the impact of FDA boxed warnings on prescribing patterns; compare effects of respiratory viral testing on antimicrobial de-escalation in hospital patients; and surveillance of adverse drug reactions among patients with severe systemic infections who continue intravenous antibiotic therapy outside of the hospital.

 

In addition to antibiotic stewardship and treatment of infectious diseases, Kinlaw has also pursued collaborative research in several other therapeutic areas, including gastrointestinal disease (e.g., ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, diverticulitis), cancer, asthma, overactive bladder, cardiovascular disease, and pregnancy.

 

RECENT PUBLICATIONS (2017-present):

  1. Richardson DB, Cole SR, Keil AP, Edwards JK, Kinlaw AC. Standardizing Discrete Time Hazard Ratios with a Disease Risk Score. American Journal of Epidemiology 2020; in press.

 

  1. Barnes EL, Jiang Y, Kappelman MD, Long MD, Sandler RS, Kinlaw AC*, Herfarth HH*. Decreasing Colectomy Rate for Ulcerative Colitis in the United States between 2007 and 2016: A Time Trend Analysis. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 2019; 2019 Oct 21. pii: izz247 [e-pub ahead of print]. PMID: 31634390 doi: 10.1093/ibd/izz247

* Kinlaw and Herfarth contributed equally and shared last-author responsibilities.

 

  1. Mitchell AP, Kinlaw AC, Peacock-Hinton S, Dusetzina SB, Sanoff HK, Lund JL. Use of High-Cost Cancer Treatments in Academic and Private Practice. The Oncologist 2019; 2019 Oct 14. pii: theoncologist.2019-0338 [e-pub ahead of print]. PMID: 31611329. doi: 10.1634/theoncologist.2019-0338

 

  1. Richardson DB, Keil AP, Cole SR, Kinlaw AC. Assessing Exposure-Response Trends Using the Disease Risk Score. Epidemiology 2019; 2019 Nov 25 [e-pub ahead of print]. PMID: 31809343. doi: 10.1097/EDE.0000000000001145

 

  1. Mbah O, Kinlaw AC, Trogdon JG, Wheeler SB, Samuel CA. The Affordable Care Act and Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Screening among Individuals 50-64 Years Old. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2019; 58(2):175-181. PMID: doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2019.09.002

 

  1. Strassle PD, Kinlaw AC, Angle HL, Lumpkin S, Chaumont N, Koruda MJ, Peery AF. Rates of Elective Colectomy for Diverticulitis in the United States Before and After a Guideline Change. Gastroenterology 2019; 2019 Sep 6. pii: S0016-5085(19)41303-6. PMID: 31499038. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2019.08.045

 

  1. Richardson DB, Keil AP, Kinlaw AC, Cole SR. Marginal Structural Models for Risk or Prevalence Ratios for a Point Exposure Using a Disease Risk Score. American Journal of Epidemiology 2019; 188(5):960-966. PMID: 30726868. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwz025.

 

  1. Kinlaw AC, Marx AH, Farel CE. Bias-corrected Estimates of Time-varying Adverse Drug Event Rates for Patients on Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy (OPAT). Clinical Infectious Diseases 2018; 67(2):316-318. PMID: 29481658. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciy104.

 

  1. Richardson DB, Kinlaw AC, Keil AP, Naimi AI, Kaufman JS, Cole SR. Inverse-probability weights for the analysis of polytomous outcomes.      American Journal of Epidemiology 2018; 187(5):1125-1127. PMID: 29390115. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwy020.

 

  1. Carey TS, Kinlaw A. Review: In primary care, CRP testing, shared decision making, and procalcitonin reduce antibiotic prescribing for ARI. Annals of Internal Medicine 2018;168(2):JC11. PMID: 29335723. doi: 10.7326/ACPJC-2018-168-2-011.

 

  1. Kinlaw AC, Jonsson Funk M, Conover MM, Pate V, Markland AD, Wu JM. Impact of New Medications and $4 Generic Programs on Overactive Bladder Treatment among Older Adults in the United States, 2000-2015. Medical Care 2018;56(2):162-170. PMID: 29287033. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0000000000000858.

 

  1. Kinlaw AC, Stürmer T, Lund JL, Pedersen L, Kappelman MD, Daniels JL, Frøslev T, Mack CD, Sørensen HT. Trends in Antibiotic Use by Birth Season and Birth Year. Pediatrics 2017;140(3):e20170441. PMID: 28808074. doi: 10.1542/peds.2017-0441.

 

  1. Kinlaw AC, Buckley JP, Engel SM, Poole C, Brookhart MA, Keil AP. Left Truncation Bias to Explain the Protective Effect of Smoking on Preeclampsia: Potential, but How Plausible? Epidemiology 2017; 28:428-434. PMID: 28145985. doi: 10.1097/EDE.0000000000000632.

 

  1. Kinlaw AC, Jonsson Funk M, Steiner MJ, Conover MM, Pate V, Wu JM. Trends in Pharmacotherapy for Bladder Dysfunction Among Children in the United States, 2000-2013. Clinical Pediatrics 2017; 56(1):55-64. PMID: 27075022. doi: 10.1177/0009922816641366.

Alan Kinlaw

(919) 966-2747

akinlaw@unc.edu

Alan Kinlaw, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy. His research focuses generally on pharmaco-epidemiology and health services research that leverages large and high-dimensional secondary data, including healthcare claims data, clinical registry data, and electronic health records. He studies patterns of medication use and comparative effectiveness and safety, related to antibiotic stewardship as well as several other substantive areas.

Samantha Eiffert

eiffert@email.unc.edu

Sam started her PhD studies in 2019 in the Pharmacoepidemiology concentration, and is currently conducting simulation and empirical studies on matched cohort designs, as well as on the use and comparative effectiveness/safety of intravenous antibiotics.

Joehl Nguyen

joehl@email.unc.edu

Joehl started his PhD studies in 2017, and is currently conducting studies on use and comparative effectiveness/safety of biologic medications for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, which is also the focus of his dissertation research.

Xintong Li

xli@unc.edu

Xintong earned her Master of Health Sciences (MHS) degree in Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in 2019. She joined our team in DPOP later that summer, and has led studies of time-varying treatment patterns for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.