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Klarissa Dawniette Jackson

Assistant Professor

Klarissa Dawniette Jackson, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor


Klarissa_Jackson

PHONE
(919) 962-5551
EMAIL
klarissa.jackson@unc.edu
ADDRESS
301 Pharmacy Lane, 3320 Kerr Hall, 7569, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599
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Klarissa Jackson, Ph.D. joined the faculty at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy as an assistant professor in the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics in 2019. Her research interests focus on drug metabolism and toxicology to better understand the mechanisms and risk factors of adverse drug reactions and improve drug safety.

Jackson received her B.S. in chemistry from Jackson State University and her Ph.D. in pharmacology from Vanderbilt University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington School of Pharmacy in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry under the mentorship of Drs. Allan Rettie and Sidney Nelson. Prior to joining UNC, Jackson was an assistant professor at Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and an adjunct assistant professor at Vanderbilt University in the Department of Pharmacology.

Jackson’s research program has been supported by funding from the NIH National Cancer Institute Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Her laboratory is currently investigating the role of cytochromes P450 in the metabolism and hepatotoxicity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors used in targeted cancer therapy. She is interested in understanding the impact of variability in drug metabolism and disposition on individual risk for drug toxicity. The long-term goal of this research is to better predict and prevent serious adverse reactions and improve drug safety in diverse patient populations.

The Jackson laboratory focuses on translational research in drug metabolism and toxicology to elucidate the mechanisms of and risk factors for adverse drug reactions. An important goal of the laboratory is to identify the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to inter-individual variability in drug disposition, drug response, and drug toxicity. Our laboratory is currently investigating the influence of individual variations in cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes on the metabolism and hepatotoxicity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors used in cancer therapy as well as the natural product cannabidiol used in epilepsy treatment. We are also engaged in collaborative research to evaluate the structure-metabolism-toxicity relationships of novel compounds in drug discovery. The long-term goals of this research are to improve the prediction of serious adverse reactions, mitigate drug toxicity, and accurately tailor drug therapy in diverse patient populations.Current research projects in the Jackson laboratory include the following:

  • Metabolism and hepatotoxicity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (NIH/NCI K01 CA190711)
  • Structure-metabolism-toxicity evaluation of bioactive molecules in drug discovery (NIH/NIGMS R01 GM127774)
  • Metabolism and hepatotoxicity of cannabidiol
  • Phenotypic biomarkers of cytochrome P450 3A for precision dosing (NC TraCS Pilot Grant 550KR231911

The Jackson laboratory utilizes human-relevant in vitro systems (hepatic cell cultures, tissue fractions, and recombinant enzymes) and liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry to study drug metabolism and disposition and address fundamental questions regarding the molecular mechanisms of drug toxicity and inter-individual variability in drug disposition. We also collaborate with basic scientists and clinical investigators to develop innovative solutions that will have a broader impact on improving drug safety and precision dosing in various therapeutic areas.

Learn More About the Jackson Lab

Role of Cytochrome P450 3A5 in the Metabolism and Hepatotoxicity of Lapatinib

  • Postdoctoral Fellowship, University of Washington School of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry; UNCF-Merck Postdoctoral Fellowship
  • Ph.D., Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology
  • B.S., Jackson State University College of Science, Engineering, and Technology, Department of Chemistry

  1. Bissada, J.E., Truong, V., Abouda, A.A., and *Jackson, K.D. Cytochrome P450 3A Activity is a Key Determinant of Lapatinib Metabolic Activation. Poster presentation at the NIH National Cancer Institute, Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities, Professional Development Workshop. Bethesda, MD, June 2019.
  2. *Bissada, J.E., Abouda, A.A., and Jackson, K.D. Lapatinib Metabolism in CYP3A5-Genotyped Primary Human Hepatocytes. Poster presentation at the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Annual Meeting, Experimental Biology, Orlando, FL, April 2019.
  3. *Abouda, A.A., Bissada, J.E., and Jackson, K.D. Interindividual Variation in Sunitinib Metabolism in Primary Human Hepatocytes. Poster presentation at the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Annual Meeting, Experimental Biology, Orlando, FL, April 2019. (**ASPET Student Travel Award)
  4. *Jackson, K.D., Abouda, A.A., and Wines, K.J. Characterization of Individual Differences in CYP3A5 Activity Using a CYP3A5-Selective Marker Reaction In Vitro. Poster presentation at the North American International Society for the Study of Xenobiotics Meeting, Montréal, Canada, July 2018.
  5. *Murray, J.L., Mercer, S.L., and Jackson, K.D. Metabolic Characterization of the Opioid Analgesic Meperidine and Pharmacogenetic Implications for Generation of the Neurotoxic Metabolite Normeperidine. Poster presentation at the World Congress of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Meeting, Kyoto, Japan, July 2018. (**ASPET Young Scientist Travel Award)
  6. *Jackson, K.D., Amaya, G.M., Durandis, R., Wines, K.J., Abouda, A.A., Starks, S.A., and Daniels, R.N. Metabolic Activation of Sunitinib: Implications for Sunitinib-Induced Toxicities. Poster presentation at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, April 2018.
  7. Amaya, G.M., Durandis, R, Bourgeois, D.S., and *Jackson, K.D. Metabolic Activation of Sunitinib by Cytochrome P450 1A2 and CYP3A4. Poster presentation at the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN, July 2017.
  8. *Wilson, J.T., Fief, C.A., Jackson, K.D., Mercer, S.L., and Deweese, J.E. Oxidized Products of Cannabidiol Inhibit Topoisomerase IIa. Poster presentation at the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN, July 2017.
  9. *Wilson, J.T., Jackson, K.D., Mercer, S.L., and Deweese, J.E. Oxidized Metabolites of Cannabidiol Inhibit Topoisomerase IIa. Poster presentation at the Association of Pharmaceutical Scientist Annual Meeting, Denver, CO, November 2016.
  10. *Jackson, K.D., Perkins, J.A., Bourgeois, D.S., and Mohamud, M. Metabolism and Bioactivation of the Multi-Targeted Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Sunitinib. Poster presentation at the NIH National Cancer Institute, Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities, Professional Development Workshop. Bethesda, MD, May 2016.
  11. *Murray, J.L., Mercer, S.L., and Jackson, K.D. Meperidine Metabolism: Roles of CYP2B6, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4 in Generation of the Neurotoxic Metabolite, Normeperidine. Poster presentation at the Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, March 2016.
  12. *Hardy, K.D., Perkins, J.A., Vongkhamchanh, R., and Bourgeois, D.S. Molecular Mechanisms of Drug-induced Liver Injury by Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors. Poster presentation at the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting, National Harbor, MD, July 2015.
  13. *Hardy, K.D. and Weiler, J.K. Role of Cytochrome P450 3A5 in the Metabolism and Bioactivation of Lapatinib. Poster presentation at the NIH National Cancer Institute, Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities, Professional Development Workshop. Rockville, MD, June 2015.
  14. *Hardy, K.D., Perkins, J.A., Vongkhamchanh, R., and Bourgeois, D.S. Metabolism and Bioactivation of Sunitinib In Vitro. Poster presentation at the Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, March 2015.

INTERNATIONAL/NATIONAL:

  1. Metabolic Activation of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: Case Studies with Lapatinib and Sunitinib. Invited seminar presentation. Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington, School of Pharmacy, Seattle, WA, October 2018.
  2. Exploring Your Career Path in Research. Invited podium presentation. MARC and RISE Undergraduate Research Program Seminar Series, Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC, March 2018.
  3. Metabolism and Bioactivation of Anti-Cancer Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors by Cytochrome P450 Enzymes. Invited seminar presentation. Haim G. and Jane Graumann Nagirner Weinsten Symposium Series, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, September 2017.
  4. Career Panel Discussion. Invited podium presentation. NIH/NIGMS Training, Workforce Development, and Diversity Program Directors’ Meeting, Baltimore, MD, June 2017.
  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Drug-induced Liver Injury by Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors. Invited podium presentation. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting, National Harbor, MD, July 2015. (**New Investigator Award)

STATE/LOCAL:

  1. Bioactivation of Lapatinib by CYP3A4 and CYP3A5: Impact of Genetic Polymorphism. Redox Enzymology Meeting, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, December 2018.
  2. Role of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in the Metabolic Activation of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors. Invited seminar presentation. Biology Department Seminar, Lipscomb University, Nashville, TN, February 2018.
  3. Role of Drug Metabolism in Drug-Induced Liver Injury by Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors. Invited seminar presentation. Department of Chemistry Seminar, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN, October 2017.
  4. Exploring Your Career Path in Research. Invited podium presentation. Distinguished Lectures in Drug Discovery, Vanderbilt Summer Science Academy Research Symposium, Nashville, TN, August 2017.
  5. Pharmaceutical Sciences Career Development. Invited seminar presentation. American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists Student Chapter Meeting, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, March 2017.
  6. Metabolism and Bioactivation of Sunitinib: Implications for Drug-induced Liver Injury. Invited seminar presentation. Redox Enzymology Meeting, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, February 2017.
  7. Mechanisms of Drug-Induced Liver Injury by Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors. Invited seminar presentation. Redox Enzymology Meeting, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, January 2016.