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Davidson to Lead Educational Technology Development at School

Davidson to Lead Educational Technology Development at School

Chris Davidson

07/26/2011

Chris Davidson has been named as the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy’s new director of educational technology research and development.

In his new role, Davidson will work closely with faculty and ITS Teaching and Learning to foster the creation, development, and integration of a host of multimedia educational offerings into the professional and graduation programs in the School. His work will play a key role in the implementation of the educational renaissance initiative that was incorporated into the School’s strategic plan in 2007.

The goal of the Educational Renaissance Initiative is to transform the educational process to prepare professional and graduate students to enter into their profession and continue to develop throughout their careers. Within this initiative is a goal to move the knowledge-acquisition aspect of education out of the classroom and make it accessible on-line in the form of various multimedia educational tools. This technologic aspect of the educational mission is supported by $2 million in matched funding from the Carolina Partnership and the Pharmacy Network Foundation.

Davidson will work closely with the Office of Assessment, the Center for Educational Excellence in Pharmacy, and the Curriculum Committee to ensure that highly innovative teaching methods become standard best practice and will work to develop partnerships with outside constituencies including the schools of medicine, education, and public health, as well as other schools of pharmacy.

Davidson comes to the School from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health where he was first data manager and then project manager for the United Arab Emirates Environmental Health Project. He holds a master’s degree in engineering and a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the University of Florida.

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