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Innovations and Transformations in Pharmaceutical Sciences 2021


A virtual conference for current and future scientists to learn about the discovery, delivery and clinical use of drugs and vaccines.

July 12-16, 2021 | July 19-23, 2021 | July 26-30, 2021

ITPS-Virtual: Discover, Develop, Deliver: Medicines and Vaccines is an online 3-week course offered to learners around the world. The program will expose learners to world-class professors from the No.1-ranked school of pharmacy in the United States. Participants will explore cutting-edge research and innovative technologies as professors explore the lifecycle of drugs and vaccines in our modern world.

The first week of the program offers introductory topics in pharmaceutical sciences with the second and third weeks diving deeper into the fascinating science and clinical application of drugs and vaccines. Hear from our world-renowned researchers as they discuss hot topics such as COVID-19 treatment, global immunization programs, medication dosing in children, and so much more.

Classes will be held Monday through Friday from 7:30-9:30 a.m. EST for the weeks of July 12, July 19, and July 26.

ITPS_graphic

 

“I feel very honored to be able to listen to the lectures of the world’s top pharmaceutical scientists, and I did learn a lot of basic knowledge. The most important thing is that this activity completely ignited my enthusiasm for pharmaceutical research and I hope that I can develop in this field in the future.”

– ITPS Virtual 2020 Participant

Pricing

Cost for full program $400 USD

For group rates, contact Laura Bratsch.


Who Should Attend?

  • Students interested in a career in pharmaceutical sciences/biopharmaceutical research and drug development.
  • Faculty from schools of pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences who desire to learn more about pharmaceutical science topics and ongoing research at UNC.
  • Individuals working in biopharmaceutical research and drug development.

Why Attend?

To learn about cutting-edge drug research and techniques from some of the leading pharmaceutical scientists in the world.

Module 1: Vaccines

Module 2: Drug and Probe Development

Module 3: PK/PD and Drug Metabolism

Module 4: Pharmacogenomics

Module 5: Drug Delivery Systems

Module 6: Outcomes and Policy

When to Attend?

Week 1: July 12-16, 7:30–9:30 a.m. US EDT

Week 2: July 19-23, 7:30–9:30 a.m. US EDT

Week 3: July 26-30, 7:30–9:30 a.m. US EDT

 

  Time (EST) Activity
Week 1
July 12

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

Welcome / Zoom Tutorial / UNC Overview

Dr. Stephen Eckel and Dr. Mike Jarstfer

 
  8:35am – 9:30am

 

 

Module 1: Vaccines

COVID-19 Vaccine Formulations in Development

Dr. Kristy Ainslie

 
July 13

 

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

 

Module 1: Vaccines

COVID-19 Vaccines and Vaccine Hesitancy

Dr. Sachi Ozawa

 
  8:35am – 9:30am

 

 

Module 1: Vaccines

Vaccine Hesitancy in Rural Communities

Dr. Delesha Carpenter

 
July 14

 

 

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

 

 

Professional Development

Introduction to the Scientific Article: How to Get the Most out of the Science

Dr. Cati Callahan and Dr. Kristin Inman

NIEHS (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences) Guest Speakers

 
  8:35am – 9:30am

 

 

Module 1: Vaccines

Beyond Vaccines: The Use of Therapeutic Agents in the Management of COVID-19 Infections

Dr. Dennis Williams

 
July 15

 

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

 

Module 1: Professional Development

Principles of Nanoparticle Vaccine Design and Formulation

Cole Batty

   
  8:00am – 8:30am

 

 

Module 2: Drug and Probe Development

More than Anticoagulant: Anti-Inflammatory Glycans

Yi-En Liao

 
  8:40am – 9:30am

 

 

Module 2: Drug and Probe Development

Computer-Assisted Drug Discovery: Key Approaches, Accessible Tools, and Case Studies

Dr. Alex Tropsha

 
July 16

 

 

7:30am – 8:20am

 

 

Module 2: Drug and Probe Development

Development of Chemical Probes for Kinases Implicated in Neurodegeneration

Dr. Alison Axtman

 
  8:30am – 9:00am

 

 

Module 2: Drug and Probe Development

Precise Gene Regulation Can Be Achieved by Using CRISPR and Small Bifunctional Molecules

Dongbo Lu

   
  9:00am – 9:30am Week 1 Wrap-Up

Dr. Stephen Eckel and Dr. Mike Jarstfer

  Time (EST) Activity
Week 2
July 19

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

Module 3: PK/PD and Drug Metabolism  

Patrick Hanafin

 
  8:35am – 9:30am

 

Module 3: PK/PD and Drug Metabolism  

Dr. Gauri Rao

 
July 20

 

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

 

Module 5: Drug Delivery Systems 

Dr. Andrew Satterlee

 
  8:35am – 9:30am

 

 

Module 1: Vaccines

Effects of Viral Infections and Vaccines on the Innate Immune System and the Pharmacology of Complex Drugs

Dr. William Zamboni

 
July 21

 

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

 

Module 3: PK/PD and Drug Metabolism  

Drug Transport Proteins

Dr. Kim Brouwer

 
  8:35am – 9:30am

 

 

Module 3: PK/PD and Drug Metabolism  

Clinical Pharmacology and Post-Marketing Adverse Events: HIV Integrase Inhibitors and Weight Gain

Dr. Julie Dumond

 
July 22

 

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

 

Module 3: PK/PD and Drug Metabolism  

Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interactions and Their Influence on Drug Dosing in the Pediatric Population

Dr. Daniel Gonzalez

 
  8:35am – 9:30am

 

 

Module 3: PK/PD and Drug Metabolism 

Hepatic Drug Metabolism: General Concepts and Practical Applications

Dr. Klarissa Jackson

 
July 23

 

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

 

Module 4: Pharmacogenomics  

Advancements in Genetically Guided Pharmacotherapy

Dr. Erin Heinzen

 
  8:35am – 9:30am

 

 

Professional Development

 Overview of Evidence-Based Literature

 Rebecca Carlson

 
  Time (EST) Activity
Week 3
July 26

 

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

 

Module 4: Pharmacogenomics

Observational Design Studies: Considerations for Pharmacogenomics and Biomarker Research

Dr. Craig Lee

   
  8:30am – 9:00am

 

 

Module 4: Pharmacogenomics

Harnessing Evolutionary Principles to Circumvent Tumor Resistance

Jiawei Zhou

   
  9:00am – 9:30am

 

Module 5: Drug Delivery Systems

An Introduction to Biomedical Engineering Technologies for Brain Cancer Therapy

Jasmine King

   
July 27

 

 

7:30am – 8:00am

 

 

Module 5: Drug Delivery Systems 

Macrophage Cell-Mediated Gene Delivery for Cancer Therapy

Lida Ghazanfari

   
  8:00am – 8:30am

 

 

Module 5: Drug Delivery Systems

Ultrasound-Mediated Drug Delivery: Microbubble Therapeutics

Phil Durham

   
  8:35am – 9:30am

 

 

Professional Development

Introduction to Grant Writing

Dr. Ruth Everett

   
July 28

 

7:30am – 8:25am

 

Professional Development

CV/Personal Statement Writing

   
  8:35am – 9:30am

 

 

Module 6: Outcomes and Policy

Bringing Innovations to Life: Using Implementation Science to Translate Evidence to Benefit Patients

Dr. Megan Roberts

   
July 29

 

 

7:30am – 8:00am

 

 

Module 6: Outcomes and Policy

Economic Evaluations in Healthcare

Swetha Srinivasan

   
  8:00am – 8:30am

 

 

Module 6: Outcomes and Policy

The Role of Policy in Shaping Access to Substance Use Treatment  

Phillip Hughes

   
  8:40am – 9:30am

 

Professional Development

Overview of Pharmacy Programs

   
July 30

 

7:30am – 8:30am

 

Professional Development

UNC Student Panel

   
  8:40am – 9:30am

 

Program Wrap-Up

Dr. Stephen Eckel and Dr. Mike Jarstfer

 

kristy_ainslie

Kristy Ainslie, Ph.D.

Kristy Ainslie, Ph.D. applies her knowledge base in biomaterials, and immunology to develop new immune-modulatory therapies that treat and prevent infectious, and autoimmune diseases. Her lab aims to design practical and innovative formulations, taking into account the scalable production and applications in developing nations. She has several research areas of interest including the development of new polymers for vaccines, formulation of antigen specific therapies to treat autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, host directed therapies for treatment of multi-drug resistant infections, electrospun scaffolds for glioblastoma treatment, and electrospray for fabrication of immune targeting microparticles. Originally from Michigan, she received her bachelor of science in chemical engineering from Michigan State University and then earned both her master’s and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Pennsylvania State University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California at San Francisco. Additionally, Dr. Ainslie has been awarded the Controlled Release Society’s Outstanding Oral Drug Delivery Award in 2007 and 2009. She joined the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in 2014 as an associate professor in the Division of Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics. Prior to that, she spent almost five years as an assistant professor at the Ohio State University’s Division of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry.


alison_axtman

Alison Axtman, Ph.D.

Alison Axtman, Ph.D. is a synthetic medicinal chemist with more than 10 years of research experience working at the interface of chemistry and biology. Axtman earned her Ph.D. in Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Kansas, and carried out her postdoctoral training in the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University. Axtman’s research has focused on the synthesis of small molecules that selectively modulate proteins implicated in disease-propagating pathways. As a member of the GSK Chemical Biology department, she led a program to understand the molecular basis of immune modulation by a class of natural products and developed analogs with improved drug properties. Axtman is currently an assistant professor in the Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry Department in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. At the SGC-UNC, she leads the design of novel chemical probes for understudied protein kinases that will be openly shared with collaborators to facilitate target discovery in human disease-relevant assays. When she’s not in the lab, Axtman can most often be found at the gym preparing for the next CrossFit or GRID competition with her teammates.


Cole Batty

Cole Batty

Cole graduated with a BS in Chemistry from the University of Minnesota in 2014. He spent three years at Nanocopoeia in Saint Paul, Minnesota working on manufacturing amorphous nanoparticle formulations to enhance bioavailability of poorly-absorbed drugs before beginning graduate school at UNC in 2017. He presently works in the laboratory of Dr. Kristy Ainslie, where he investigates drug delivery strategies to enhance the effectiveness of vaccines for infectious diseases including influenza, dengue, and SARS-CoV-2.


kim brouwer

Kim L.R. Brouwer, Pharm.D., Ph.D.

Kim L.R. Brouwer, Pharm.D., Ph.D., is the William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor in the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, associate dean for research and graduate education, and a professor in the curriculum in toxicology. Brouwer received her B.S. in pharmacy from Oregon State University. She completed her Pharm.D. at the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Pharmacy in conjunction with a pharmacy residency at the UK Medical Center and a PhD in pharmaceutical sciences/pharmacokinetics. After postdoctoral training (pharmacology/drug metabolism) in the UK College of Medicine, she joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina in 1986, where she served as director of graduate studies for the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy from 1996 to 2004, and Chair of the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics from 2004-2015. Brouwer directs an NIH-funded research program focused on hepatobiliary drug disposition and development and refinement of in vitro model systems to predict in vivo hepatobiliary disposition, drug interactions, and hepatotoxicity. She has mentored more than 104 undergraduate, professional, graduate and postdoctoral students and published more than 230 research papers, reviews and book chapters in addition to more than 240 published abstracts.Brouwer is also a co-inventor of B-CLEAR® (U.S. Patent No. 6,780,580), an in vitro method to assess hepatic uptake, excretion, and biliary clearance that correlates with in vivo data. This technology has been exclusively licensed from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to Qualyst, Inc. Brouwer is a Qualystco-founder and former chair of the company’s scientific advisory board. Qualyst Transporter Solutions was acquired by BioIVT in August 2017.She served as a member of the NIH Pharmacology Study Section from 1998 to 2002, and is a member of the editorial advisory boards for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, CPT Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology, Clinical and Translational Science, and the AAPS Journal. She was elected an AAPS Fellow in 1998, was recipient of the PHRMA Foundation Award in Excellence in Pharmaceutics in 2001, received the inaugural Pharmaceutical Sciences Outstanding Graduate Program Alumni Award and the Paul F. Parker Award from the University of Kentucky, and was the recipient of the 2018 ASCPT-FDA Abrams Award.


Cati Callahan

Cati Callahan, Ph.D.

Cati received her Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University at Buffalo in 2016 and her MA in environmental resource policy from George Washington University in 2012. As a postdoctoral fellow at the National Cancer Institute, Cati planned and conducted epidemiological analyses in the Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics. Her research focused on molecular epidemiologic studies of renal cancer and lymphomas with an emphasis on exposure to chlorinated solvents, lead, and persistent pollutants. Cati formerly worked at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, where she planned and conducted scientific reviews of drug safety studies. Cati is currently a Science Editor for the academic journal Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP), where she works primarily with submissions related to human observational studies.


rebecca_carlson

Rebecca Carlson, MLS, AHIP

Rebecca Carlson, MLS, is Health Sciences Librarian and Liaison to the School of Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Rebecca is the primary provider of library support for the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, and is responsible for collaborating with faculty to design and provide curriculum-integrated instruction; participating in new program planning, accreditation processes, and the scholarship of teaching and learning; providing research and scholarly communication consultations, expert literature searches, and other services for teaching, clinical care, research, and administrative purposes.

Rebecca is the Clinical Librarian for the Department of Surgery at UNC-Chapel Hill. She is the primary provider of library support for surgery, including collaborating on surgical research, evidence-based practice, and clinical education. Rebecca also serves as one of the Interprofessional Education and Practice Directors for the Health Science Library and works with the Office of Interprofessional Education and Practice at UNC-Chapel Hill. Rebecca has her Master of Science in Library Science degree from UNC-Chapel Hill and is a senior member of the Medical Library Association’s Academy of Health Information Professionals.


delesha_carpenter

Delesha Carpenter, Ph.D., MSPH

Delesha Carpenter, Ph.D., MSPH, is an associate professor and Interim Chair in the Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy. She is particularly interested in developing training and innovative mobile health (mHealth) technologies to improve patients’ chronic disease self-management and quality of life, especially for rural populations. She has developed an adolescent asthma self-management app and a tailored video software program to improve children’s asthma inhaler technique. She also has developed training to help community pharmacists discuss sensitive topics, like opioid overdose and suicide. She teaches the Social & Behavioral Aspects of Pharmaceutical Use course and has enjoyed mentoring PhD students, PharmD students, and hosting students from other universities for research rotations. Carpenter has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles on the topics of pediatric asthma, patient-provider communication, the effects of conflicting medication information on medication adherence, and evaluating the impact of technology on patient outcomes. She has received funding to support her research from a diverse body of funders, including the American Lung Association, Arthritis Foundation, NIH, NSF, the Veteran’s Administration, and start-up companies.


julie_dumond

Julie Dumond, Pharm.D., M.S.

Julie Dumond is an assistant professor in the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics. Her primary research interest is the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of antiretrovirals for HIV treatment and prevention. She is Chair of the MACS/WIHS Combined Cohort Study Pharmacology Working Group, and is currently conducting a study of intracellular tenofovir pharmacology within the cohort (R21AG058490). She also serves as the HIV Prevention Trials Network Pharmacologist on four NIH-sponsored early-phase studies of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies for HIV prevention. She also has an interest in the influence of cellular and biologic aging on antiretroviral PK/PD and immunologic recovery of persons living with HIV.

Dumond directs the first module in the DPET graduate pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics curriculum, DPET 853, and is one of the DPET Division Directors for the Research and Scholarship in Pharmacy (RASP) program for Doctor of Pharmacy students.


Phillip_Durham

Phillip G. Durham

Phil obtained his undergraduate degree in Biochemistry at NCSU. Following undergraduate studies, he started at RTI International where his experience in nanotoxicology, antiretroviral formulation and inhaled drug delivery ultimately led to his decision to pursue a graduate degree in pharmaceutical sciences here at UNC. Currently, Phil is studying in Dr. Paul Dayton’s lab, developing new applications for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. His research includes therapeutic gas delivery and non-invasive delivery to the brain using ultrasound and cavitation agents such as microbubbles and nanodroplets.


Ruth Everett

Ruth Everett, Ph.D.

Ruth Everett worked for several years as a lecturer and head of the Department of Zoology at Jyoti Nivas College, Bangalore. She gained experience in cell and molecular biology at the Cystic Fibrosis/Pulmonary Research and Treatment Center at UNC-Chapel Hill and at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (Department of Pulmonary Medicine) as a research instructor. She joined the laboratory of Dhiren Thakker initially as a visiting scholar and then as research faculty. Everett’s research interests are in the areas of metformin intestinal absorption/transport mechanisms and anticancer activities, and in the modulation of tight junctions for enhanced drug delivery.


Daniel_Gonzalez

Daniel Gonzalez, Pharm.D., Ph.D.

Daniel Gonzalez, Pharm.D., Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics of the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. He has an adjunct appointment within the Department of Pediatrics in the UNC School of Medicine. He joined the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in 2014 after completing a postdoctoral fellowship through the UNC-Duke Collaborative Clinical Pharmacology T32 Postdoctoral Training Program. Gonzalez received his Pharm.D. and Ph.D. from the University of Florida College of Pharmacy in 2008 and 2012, respectively. Gonzalez is a licensed pharmacist in North Carolina and Florida.

Gonzalez’s experiences have afforded a highly collaborative and multidisciplinary research program focused on advancing pediatric public health by promoting the safe, effective, and individualized use of drugs in children. His research interests include pediatric clinical pharmacology and the application of mathematical modeling and simulation techniques to characterize the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, guide drug dosage selection, and improve drug safety in children. Gonzalez’s research program is funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and he has published >65 peer-reviewed publications and >35 abstracts. He has served as the major advisor for 4 PhD students, 9 postdoctoral fellows, and 1 professional degree student.


Patrick-Hanafin

Patrick Hanafin

Patrick received his B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of California, Davis. He then joined the Clinical Pharmacology, Modeling and Simulation team at Amgen as a junior pharmacometrician focusing on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and translational modeling to determine first-in-human dosing for early development compounds. In Summer of 2018, Patrick left Amgen to pursue a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Science at the Eshelman School of Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Patrick currently works in laboratory of Dr. Gauri Rao where he uses modeling and systems-based approaches to inform antimicrobial therapy.


Erin_Heinzen

Erin Heinzen, Pharm.D., Ph.D.

Erin Heinzen, Pharm.D., Ph.D., is an associate professor at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics with a joint appointment in the UNC Department of Genetics. Dr. Heinzen received her Pharm.D. (2001) and her Ph.D. (2004) in Pharmaceutical Sciences from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She then went on to do postdoctoral training in human genetics at Duke University. Previously she served as Deputy Director of the Institute for Genomic Medicine and was the Herbert Irving Assistant Professor of the Department of Pathology & Cell Biology at Columbia University. Dr. Heinzen is a licensed pharmacist in North Carolina and New York.
Dr. Heinzen’s research broadly focuses on neurodevelopment disease genetics. She has contributed to the discovery of 15 novel epilepsy genes, and the gene responsible for Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood, a rare neurodevelopmental disorder. She part of multiple highly collaborative research groups including the Epi4K Consortium, Epi25 Collaborative, EPIGEN, the ILAE Consortium of Complex Epilepsies, Pediatric Status Epilepticus Research Group, and the Epilepsy Genetics Initiative. Dr. Heinzen’s research program is funded by the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.


Phillip Hughes

Phillip Hughes

Phillip has a master’s in clinical psychology and is currently a PhD student in pharmaceutical outcomes and policy. His primary interests are mental health and substance use treatment and focuses on two main topic areas. First, he seeks to understand how policies at the state and national level, such as scope-of-practice regulations, impact psychotherapeutic medication access. Second, he is interested in understanding who chooses to engage with the healthcare system for mental health and substance use treatment and why.


Kristin Inman

Kristin Inman, Ph.D.

Kristin earned a B.Sc. in Microbiology and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Science and completed postdoctoral fellowships in both Neuropharmacology and Cancer Biology laboratories. Kristin also earned her Board of Editors in the Life Sciences (BELS) certification as an Editor in the Life Science (ELS). After working as a post-doctoral fellow, she transitioned to medical writing and editing, working for two departments within the Mayo Clinic as well as freelance editing scientific manuscripts for non-native English speakers. Kristin has also held the position of Editorial Director at MPS, a publishing services company, where she managed medical and scientific publishing projects, including managing a team of on-staff editors and a freelance editorial team, as well as editing medical content and assessment items. Kristin is currently a contractor for the academic journal Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP), where she holds the position of Associate Science Editor, evaluating manuscripts at submission and prior to formal acceptance to ensure they meet the journal’s standards. Kristin is also involved in the journal’s Early Career Investigator Initiative, which was formed to develop valuable experiences and learning opportunities to early-stage researchers across the various stages of scholarly publishing, including authorship, peer review, and manuscript editing.


Klarissa_Jackson

Klarissa Jackson, Ph.D.

Klarissa Jackson, Ph.D. joined the faculty at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy as an assistant professor in the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics in 2019. Her research interests focus on drug metabolism and toxicology to better understand the mechanisms and risk factors of adverse drug reactions and improve drug safety.
Jackson received her B.S. in chemistry from Jackson State University and her Ph.D. in pharmacology from Vanderbilt University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington School of Pharmacy in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry under the mentorship of Drs. Allan Rettie and Sidney Nelson. Prior to joining UNC, Jackson was an assistant professor at Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and an adjunct assistant professor at Vanderbilt University in the Department of Pharmacology.

Jackson’s research program has been supported by funding from the NIH National Cancer Institute Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Her laboratory is currently investigating the role of cytochromes P450 in the metabolism and hepatotoxicity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors used in targeted cancer therapy. She is interested in understanding the impact of variability in drug metabolism and disposition on individual risk for drug toxicity. The long-term goal of this research is to better predict and prevent serious adverse reactions and improve drug safety in diverse patient populations.


jasmine_king

Jasmine King

Jasmine King is a licensed Pharmacist in the state of North Carolina and a 3rd year PhD Candidate in the Division of Pharmacoengineering and Molecular Pharmaceutics at the University of North Carolina – Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Jasmine received a Bachelor of Science in Biology and a Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She also earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in Worcester, MA.

While in pharmacy school, Jasmine pursued research opportunities that focused on optimizing the delivery of anticancer agents for various cancers. She learned that there were many limitations with current treatment modalities and wanted to further her knowledge and research skills to afford opportunities for breakthrough science that can impact patients globally. Therefore, Jasmine pursued a PhD and her current research is focused on stem cell engineering and developing polymer-based drug delivery systems to improve brain cancer. Her ultimate goal is to develop novel technologies for the treatment of cancer that can be translated from bench to bedside. Jasmine is also passionate about expanding access to STEM education and advocating for diversity in STEM and professional degree programs.


Craig-Lee

Craig Lee, Pharm.D., Ph.D.

Craig Lee, Pharm.D, Ph.D. is an associate professor and the vice-chair for research and graduate education in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy’s Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics. Lee is a licensed pharmacist in North Carolina and is trained as a clinical/translational pharmaceutical scientist with expertise in cytochrome P450 metabolism, cardiovascular experimental therapeutics, and precision medicine/pharmacogenomics.

Since the initiation of his faculty appointment in 2006, Lee has established a highly collaborative and translational research program that integrates mechanistically-driven rodent and cell-based preclinical models with observational and interventional clinical studies. He has received funding from the National Institutes of Health and American Heart Association, authored over 90 manuscripts and over 90 abstracts in the areas of cytochromes P450, eicosanoid and drug metabolism, pharmacogenomics, and experimental therapeutics, and has served as the major research advisor for three Pharm.D./Ph.D. graduate students, 16 post-doctoral fellows, and 19 professional/undergraduate students.

Lee currently serves as director of the School’s Research and Scholarship in Pharmacy pathway for Pharm.D. students and is actively engaged as a teacher and mentor in the School’s professional, graduate and fellowship programs.

He is also an active member of the UNC McAllister Heart Institute and UNC Program for Precision Medicine in Healthcare and has an adjunct faculty appointment in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Cardiology.


Yi-En Liao

Yi-En Liao

Yi-En Liao is currently an upcoming fourth-year PhD candidate in Jian Liu’s lab. She graduated from Taipei Medical University in 2016 with a B.S. in Pharmacy and the University of Southern California in 2018 with an M.S. in Pharmaceutical Science. Currently, her work focuses on the potential therapeutic effects and mechanisms of heparin-like compounds in sepsis in vitro and in vivo.


dongbo_lu

Dongbo Lu, M.S.

Dongbo Lu is from Beijing, China and received her BS in Pharmacy and MS in Chemical Biology at Peking University. Her thesis work in Master’s was design, synthesis and activity study of small molecule inhibitors. After graduated as an honored student, Dongbo started her PhD study in CBMC, ESOP in UNC at Chapel Hill in 2017 and joined the Hathaway lab working on precise gene regulation using small bifunctional molecules and CRISPR/Cas technology.


Sachiko-Ozawa

Sachiko Ozawa, Ph.D., M.H.S.

Sachiko Ozawa, Ph.D., M.H.S., is a health economist whose work focuses on generating evidence that can be used to improve the health of populations globally. Her research focuses on examining the value of vaccines, assessing the economic burden of diseases and examining the demand and utilization of health care. She is interested in the interface between pharmacy and public health from the perspective of a global health economist.

Ozawa’s previous research estimated the return on investment from childhood immunization in low- and middle-income countries, examined people’s trust in the health system and assessed the transition of global health programs from donors to local governments. Her findings have been used by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, World Health Organization and Gavi (the Vaccine Alliance) to advocate for vaccine introduction and coverage increases in low- and middle-income countries. For example, her work has been instrumental in securing the funding replenishment for Gavi of $7.5 billion for 2016–2020 and contributed to a declaration signed by 20 health ministers at the Ministerial Conference on Immunization in Africa in 2016 to increase the use of vaccines in preventing infectious diseases.

She serves on the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts Global Vaccine Action Plan Working Group on the demand for immunization. She is also a member of the Scientific Committee Review Panel for the International Health Economics Association.

Ozawa received her M.H.S. and Ph.D. from the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is trained in health systems and health economics. Prior to joining the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in fall 2016, she was a faculty member at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Ozawa received magna cum laude from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and is a graduate of Phillips Academy, Andover. She is a member of both the Phi Beta Kappa National Honors Society and the Delta Omega Public Health Honors Society.

She is actively recruiting highly motivated members at all levels (research associates, graduate students) interested in global health economics research to join her research group.


gauri_rao

Gauri Rao, Pharm.D., M.S.

Gauri Rao, Pharm.D., M.S., joined the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy as a tenure-track assistant professor in the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experiential Education in 2016.

Rao’s principal research interests surround quantitative systems pharmacology, and she is working to understand the processes of infectious diseases, specifically how the infecting pathogen and host immune system interact with each other. Her work is extending the knowledge of complex host-pathogen interactions and perturbations imposed by therapeutic interventions during a time of increasing bacterial resistance, a diminishing antibiotic drug pipeline and a lack of viable treatment options for infections due to highly drug-resistant bacteria.

During her research fellowship, Rao worked with Alan Forrest, Ph.D., to model viral kinetics using a systems-based approach, which she says she plans to apply to bacterial-host interactions. Her research shifted while she was obtaining her Doctor of Pharmacy, as she developed novel dosing mechanisms for old antibiotics aimed at conserving their efficacy by maximizing the pharmacodynamics while minimizing the emergence of resistance. This work was the foundation for a $4.45 million grant funded by NIH/NIAID in 2014.

In the past year, Rao has written and contributed to a successful research proposal funded by NIAID that focuses on principles of adaptive feedback control systems borrowed from engineering control systems for the optimal dosing of polymyxin B in critically ill patients.

Rao received her bachelor’s in electronics engineering from Pune University in India in 1993, her master’s in computer engineering from Michigan State University in 1997, and her Doctor of Pharmacy in 2011, and her master’s of pharmaceutical sciences in 2015 from the University of Buffalo.


megan_roberts

Megan Roberts, Ph.D.

Megan Roberts, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy and the Director of Implementation Science in Precision Health and Society at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Her research focuses on evaluating and improving the implementation of genomic medicine. In particular, she is interested in conducting research to understand how precision medicine technologies can be implemented to improve access to, and reduce disparities in, high-quality care and prevention. To date, her research has largely focused on the implementation of genomic medicine, disparities in access to genomic medicine, risk communication, and the impact of policies on the implementation of research, clinical and public health practices.

Roberts was awarded a position in the NC TraCS KL2 program for her project entitled, “Overcoming barriers to the uptake of cascade screening for Lynch Syndrome.” She is also a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and a participant in the National Academies of Sciences Engineering Medicine’s Genomics and Population Health Action Collaborative.


Andrew_Satterlee

Andrew Satterlee, Ph.D.

Dr. Andrew Satterlee completed both his Ph.D. and postdoctoral research at UNC, and now works within the Eshelman Institute for Innovation to translate academic ideas toward the clinic. Dr. Satterlee’s research develops models of brain cancer to better understand and predict responses to novel and approved therapies using live, organotypic tissue explants.


swetha srinivasan

Swetha Srinivasan

Swetha Srinivasan is a PhD Candidate in Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy at UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy at UNC Chapel Hill. Her research is broadly focused on improving the implementation of precision medicine in clinical practice, and her dissertation specifically focuses on examining uptake and impact of molecular testing in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Prior to her PhD, Swetha received her master’s in Microbial Biotechnology from North Carolina State University.


alexander_tropsha

Alex Tropsha, Ph.D.

Alex Tropsha, Ph.D., is an expert in the fields of computational chemistry, cheminformatics and structural bioinformatics who works to develop new methodologies and software tools for computer-assisted drug design. He is creating new approaches to protein 3D structure analysis and prediction based on the principles of statistical geometry. His particular expertise lies in the field of cheminformatics, a discipline where information and informatics methodologies are applied to storing, managing, exploring and exploiting chemical databases. In layman’s terms, cheminformatics combines chemistry and computer science to aid in the discovery of new drugs.

Tropsha has authored more than 190 peer-reviewed papers and 20 books and book chapters. He joined the School’s faculty in 1991 as an assistant professor and director of the Laboratory for Molecular Modeling. He was promoted to associate professor in 1997 and to full professor in 2004 and holds appointments as an adjunct professor in the UNC Department of Biomedical Engineering and in the Department of Computer Science and is a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. He was named as the K. H. Lee Distinguished Professor in 2008.

As associate dean for pharmacoinformatics and data science, Tropsha serves as the chief informatics officer in the School and provides oversight and strategic direction for the research and training programs in data-rich areas of pharmaceutical sciences.


Bill-Zamboni

William Zamboni, Pharm.D., Ph.D.

William Zamboni, Pharm.D., Ph.D., received his bachelor of science, doctor of pharmacy and doctor of philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He completed his oncology residency at the Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, MD, and his research fellowship at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, in Memphis, Tennessee.

Currently, he is an associate professor in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. Zamboni’s research program is part of the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics in the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and Molecular Therapeutics in the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. He is the director of UNC GLP Bioanalytical Facility and the director of the Translational Oncology and Nanoparticle Drug Development Initiative (TOND2I) Lab at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He is also the co-director of the North Carolina Biomedical Innovation Network (NCBIN) for GLP toxicology and pharmacology studies of small molecule and nanoparticle agents.


jiawei zhou

Jiawei Zhou

Jiawei Zhou is currently a third year PhD student in UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy Dr. Carter Cao’s lab. She got her bachelor’s degree in Tsinghua University from China in 2018 and joined Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics since then. Her research focuses on applying mathematical models to understand tumor heterogeneity and cancer resistance. Her work was awarded with ACoP11 Statistics and Pharmacometrics Abstract Award in 2020. She is also a representative in the International School of Pharmacometrics (ISoP) Student Committee and joined ISoP student leadership team as secretary in 2021.

 

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