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Advancing Medicine for Life in the Blue Ridge Mountains and Beyond

The Asheville Campus is located in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of Western North Carolina. UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, UNC School of Medicine, UNC Gillings School of Public Health, and UNC Adams School of Dentistry have regional campuses in Asheville that emphasize care for the underserved, place-based learning, and interprofessional education and practice.

Our Asheville Campus is home to 30 student pharmacists per class, world-class faculty members in the Division of Practice Advancement and Clinical Education as well as the Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, and dedicated, student-centered staff members in administration and educational technology. We partner with MAHEC to offer PGY2 residency programs in Ambulatory Care and Geriatrics, and with Mission Health to offer PGY2 residencies in Ambulatory Care, Emergency Department, and Administration.

Asheville serves as a Transformative, Pharmacy Practice Hub for UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Emphasis is placed on patient-centered care, community engagement, and student engagement. 

At UNC, everything we do begins and ends with a patient in mind. In Asheville, pharmacists provide patient-centered care across practice settings including real-life hospital practice, interprofessional ambulatory care clinics, and innovative community pharmacy settings. Asheville-based students can participate in the Rural Pharmacy Health Certificate Program or the Ambulatory Care Pathway in order to further differentiate themselves in these areas of pharmacy practice.

Health care professionals in Asheville are committed to giving back to Western North Carolina through community engagement. Our students can frequently be seen working in a community garden, volunteering at a free clinic, and participating in community-wide emergency preparedness exercises. We foster relationships with pharmacists and providers across care settings and seek to improve the health of rural and underserved members of our community.

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The Asheville Campus values the importance of relationships. Our students enjoy the small, close-knit learning community and the close mentoring relationships with faculty, and the opportunities to learn about, with, and from other health professional students through UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC. A high level of student engagement contributes to the relationship-centered culture of Asheville.

All student pharmacists complete their first year of foundational studies on our Chapel Hill Campus, and a select cohort of students have an opportunity to complete their PharmD degree on our Asheville Campus. View the Campus Comparison Guide.


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  • Learn from national thought leaders in ambulatory care pharmacy practice who provide patient-centered care for patients in physician practices.
  • Immerse yourself in practice in the city that created internationally recognized models for medication management.
  • Collaborate with ambulatory care pharmacy residents through a mentoring program.
  • Advocate for practice advancement at the state and national level.
  • Differentiate yourself by developing the necessary skills to develop new outpatient clinical pharmacy services.

Background

The ambulatory care pharmacist optimizes medications by providing clinical services for patients in the outpatient setting. The ambulatory care pharmacist practices on interprofessional teams that include physicians, nurses, care managers, nutritionists, and mental health professionals. Common practice sites include physician offices, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Health Clinics, hospital-based clinics, employer wellness programs, the Indian Health Service, community pharmacy settings, and VA clinics.

Ambulatory care is a growing area of practice, as evidenced by the fact that PGY2 Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Residency Programs are the fasting growing residency program in the U.S. This Pathway Program will accelerate learning about ambulatory care pharmacy practice and differentiate our students.

To learn more about the important role that ambulatory care pharmacists play on the healthcare team, view the ASHP Career Tool.


Ambulatory Care Pathway Program

The Ambulatory Care Pathway Program was established to create a workforce of pharmacy leaders in outpatient pharmacy practice with exceptional skills in creating and expanding ambulatory care services.

Pharmacists in Asheville created innovative models for medication management as part of The Asheville Project® in the 1990s and served as some of the first Clinical Pharmacist Practitioners in North Carolina.

Because of the longstanding history of excellence in ambulatory care pharmacy practice in Western North Carolina, the Ambulatory Care Pathway is uniquely offered for students on the Asheville Campus.

  • Student Selection
    All UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy students complete their PY1 foundational year of study on the Chapel Hill Campus. Students will designate their campus preference for their PY2-PY4 education during the PY1 year. Thirty students will complete their education on the Asheville Campus and are able to apply for the Ambulatory Care Pathway Program. Pathway students will be selected through a competitive application process.  Evaluation criteria for acceptance include 1) career interests in outpatient pharmacy practice; 2) commitment to service to patients and community; 3) desire to advance the profession of pharmacy; and 4) communication skills.
  • Pathway Components
    The Ambulatory Care Pathway at UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy Asheville Campus provides a unique opportunity for student pharmacists to accelerate their learning about ambulatory care pharmacy practice.
    Key components of the Ambulatory Care Pathway include a seminar series, a mentoring program, and interprofessional education. Additional credit hours beyond those required in the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum are required.

Are You Interested in Learning More?

To learn more about this focused path of study, please contact:

Mercedes-Tolbert

 

Mercedes Tolbert

Reg. Director of Operations, Asheville
Mercedes_Tolbert@unc.edu

AVL-Rural-Scholars_2021The Rural Pharmacy Health Certificate program is a Graduate Certificate with a focused program of study that prepares student pharmacists for collaborative, interprofessional practice environments.

Practice environments serve the health care needs of those living in rural and small communities, and those often underserved by the healthcare system. This concentration within the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree is ideal for individuals who want to live and practice in rural areas, smaller towns, and have a heart of service.

The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy offers this uniquely on the Asheville campus as part of the School’s commitment to developing and supporting pharmacists practicing in rural communities, and addressing the social determinants of health associated with medication access and equitable care.

Students may apply to become a Rural Pharmacy Health Scholar during the fall semester of their first year of the Pharm.D. program.

Why Rural?

The demand for pharmacists is often higher in rural communities where access to medical services may be limited by geography, distance, and economic challenges. The Rural Pharmacy Health Certificate prepares individuals who enjoy small-town life for a satisfying, service-oriented pharmacy career. The Rural Pharmacy Health faculty offer mentoring and practice experiences that support students in their personal skill development and professional pathway. The courses offered in the Certificate include focused study on:

  • Population Health Management
  • Cultural Responsiveness in Healthcare
  • Introduction to the Role of Pharmacists in Public Health
  • Health Disparities and Equitable Care
  • Impact of Social Determinants of Health in Overall Patient Outcomes

While providing community service and outreach, scholars build relationships with local government, non-profits, safety-net organizations, and public health providers.

Practice in a Community You Love

Making an impact on the health of a community does not just happen within the walls of a medical practice or pharmacy. Impact happens when committed people come together and make a difference in the life of a community overall.

Rural pharmacists are vital, well respected members of not only the healthcare team, but also the town, school and business communities they serve. Scholars who successfully complete the Rural Pharmacy Health Certificate emerge as leaders in their local communities. Our Rural Scholars graduate positioned to truly make a difference in the lives of their patients.

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Seth Peterson
Asheville, NC

Megan_Aylmer

Megan Aylmer
Goodrich, MI

Brooke-Jordan-Brown

Brooke Jordan-Brown
Greenville, SC

Haley-Newton

Haley Newton
Rutherfordton, NC


Are You Interested in Learning More?

To learn more about this focused path of study, please contact:

Mercedes-Tolbert

 

Mercedes Tolbert

Reg. Director of Operations, Asheville
Mercedes_Tolbert@unc.edu

Meet Some of Our Alums

Claire Austin

Claire_Austin

Hometown: Siler City, NC

Graduation date/degree earned: Pharm.D., 2016

Current place of employment/job role: MAHEC Family Health Center and MAHEC OB/Gyn, clinical pharmacist faculty specializing in women’s health in Asheville, N.C.

Why did you choose to study pharmacy in Asheville: Honestly, I didn’t. I had just finished undergrad at UNC Chapel Hill and wanted to stay there for pharmacy school. I got placed on the Asheville campus which was my second choice. At first, I was sad to be leaving Chapel Hill and wasn’t sure how I felt about being on the satellite campus. Lucky for me it was the best thing that could have happened to me. I had a fantastic experience on the Asheville campus and fell in love with Asheville. The fact that I decided not to leave and still stay involved with the school should be testament to my love for this program.

How did the Asheville program prepare you for your current job: Asheville is a great place to learn about and get experience with ambulatory care (outpatient) pharmacy. I was able to meet, shadow and intern with pharmacists in the field that eventually led to my residency and career. Being on the smaller campus I felt more comfortable getting involved and serving in leadership roles. I think this allowed me to standout when it came time to apply for residency and jobs.

What makes the Asheville program so special: The simple answer is that the Asheville campus felt like a little family to me. I was able to get the same UNC education while forming close relationships with the faculty and other students. I always felt supported and I got more involved with organizations and clubs than I ever would have on a bigger campus. I can’t say enough about how special my experience was, just that I am thankful I ended up there!


Benjamin Lee

Ben_LeeHometown: Morganton, NC

Graduation date/degree earned: Pharm.D., 2020

Current place of employment/job role: H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, PGY1 Pharmacy Resident

Why did you choose to study pharmacy in Asheville: I chose to study pharmacy in Asheville because of the tight knit culture of the Asheville campus. I also am a fan of the mountains and was always able to do something on the weekends when I was not studying or working on projects such as hiking, kayaking, fishing or just being able to socialize with my class. Overall, I chose to study pharmacy in Asheville because of the cohort size, setting/environment and city. Asheville is a beautiful city that has something for everyone to enjoy and attach themselves to.

How did the Asheville program prepare you for your current job: During my time as a pharmacy student, I was able to take advantage of the many opportunities the Asheville Campus had available. Whether it be through leadership roles by being AEC Chair; the extracurricular patient care experiences through the ABCCM free clinic, my internship at the Cancer Center, flu clinics; or the incredibly rewarding IPPE and APPE rotations that allowed me to grow as a future pharmacist and many more. All of these elements combined to make me who I am and allowed me to really become an asset at my current role. I have been able to really take ownership of patients during my first rotations as a resident and collaborate effectively as a member of a multidisciplinary patient care team. I think most importantly was the amount of exposure I had with patient counseling and really being able to interact with patients daily on every single rotation. That exposure has made me comfortable with being able to counsel patients effectively with empathy and help the team with complex decision making and really doing what is right for the patient.

What makes the Asheville program so special: I think what makes the Asheville program so special is the word “Pharmily.” This word can be described and applied to other campuses, but I think it is a truly special connection on the Asheville Campus. I was able to establish close relationships with many of the PY2s-PY4s as a PY1 and their experience and advice definitely helped guide me to where I am. The idea of “paying it forward” runs through the spirit and actions of every single individual on the Asheville Campus. No matter who I was with, I always felt welcome.


Ally Jarvi

Ally_JarviHometown: Duluth, Minnesota

Graduation Date/degree earned: Pharm.D., 2019

Current place of employment/job role: Atrium Health Cabarrus, clinical staff pharmacist in emergency medicine

Why did you choose to study pharmacy in Asheville: I knew I would receive an outstanding education by attending the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. It was clear to me that the Asheville campus had so many added benefits. The small class size was an important aspect of the campus that I knew would optimize my learning experience. Additionally, Asheville reminded me of my hometown with the beautiful views and strong emphasis on local business.

How did the Asheville program prepare you for your current job: The Asheville program provided me valuable leadership experiences and enhanced my communication skills. These skills have been crucial during residency training and in my current job, especially as it relates to starting new services.

What makes the Asheville program so special: What makes the Asheville program so special is the unmatched support I received from faculty/staff and the lifelong friendships I developed. It takes a great deal of hard work and dedication to successfully complete pharmacy school which can be difficult in a new city away from friends and family. The Asheville campus felt like my second family which provided the support needed to exceed my own expectations.


Franklin Rodriguez

Franklin_RodriguezHometown: Asheville, NC

Graduation date/degree earned: Pharm.D., 2017

Current place of employment/job role: Asheville Compounding Pharmacy

Why did you choose to study pharmacy in Asheville: A small city with a community feel, full of art and culture with a beautiful landscape for hiking and activities.

How did the Asheville program prepare you for your current job: A solid educational program with plenty of exposure to various aspects of pharmacy, such as compounding.

What makes the Asheville program so special: The small class size and the comfortable learning environment. My experience in a higher education program was perfect here in Asheville, NC. There are plenty of amazing distractions when I needed them, and I was able to find some of the greatest places to study.


Chandler Combs

Chandler_CombsHometown: Chapel Hill, NC

Graduation date/degree earned: Pharm.D., 2016

Current place of employment/job role: PGY1 Community-based Resident at Wake Forest Baptist Health, previously an independent community pharmacist at Crossroads Pharmacy

Why did you choose to study pharmacy in Asheville: What drew me to Asheville was the perfect mixture of the same education you’d get on the Chapel Hill campus combined with the opportunities that you could only find on the Asheville campus. Being the second class on the Asheville campus, we had an incredible amount of unique learning experiences as well as opportunities to build organizations and provide services to the Asheville community.

How did the Asheville program prepare you for your current job: Seeing a wide array of unique ambulatory care and community sites during my PY4 year helped me tremendously when starting my first independent pharmacy job out of school and is still helping me now that I’m a resident. I also was able to use faculty connections I had made on the Asheville campus when I decided to go back to do a residency and all of their advice and support was incredibly helpful.

What makes the Asheville program so special: Working and learning in a smaller group was very helpful for me as a student and I loved the connection that I was able to make with both the professors and my fellow students on the Asheville campus. Additionally, the wide array of experiences offered, especially in ambulatory care and community.


Kelsy Combs

Kelsy_CombsHometown: Crumpler, NC

Graduation date/degree earned: Pharm.D., 2016

Current place of employment/job role: Clinical Pharmacist Practitioner at Greensboro Medical Associates

Why did you choose to study pharmacy in Asheville: The opportunity to receive the same great degree from UNC while being part of a smaller class size in Asheville and the opportunity to help start something new being the second Asheville class at the time.

How did the Asheville program prepare you for your current job: I went into pharmacy school having no idea what ambulatory care pharmacy even was, but the strong inpatient, community, and ambulatory care opportunities in Asheville helped me to choose which path in pharmacy I wanted to take. The faculty/preceptors in Asheville are great mentors that have provided support and advice even to this day.

What makes the Asheville program so special: The smaller class size makes going to class almost feel like you’re part of a big family. You are able to have a close connection with the other students as well as the awesome faculty which help guide you through even the most difficult parts of pharmacy.


Kristen Mahler

Kristen_MahlerHometown: Tempe, Arizona

Graduation date/degree earned: Pharm.D., 2018

Current place of employment/job role: Credena Health Pharmacy Centralia, pharmacy manager

Why did you choose to study pharmacy in Asheville:  During my interview with the School of Pharmacy in Asheville, I could tell that the faculty really cared about my pharmacy school experience. They took the time to really explain distance learning and I felt that even though it was a smaller campus, it seemed to provide as many, if not more opportunities to its students.

How did the Asheville program prepare you for your current job: While in Asheville, I had unique experiences caring for rural populations. I was able to secure a leadership role within the biggest club on campus which helped me build confidence in my leadership skills. I was also a peer mentor as well as a TA for first year lab which helped me realize my passion for teaching. I currently manage a small retail pharmacy located in a rural hospital in Washington state and precept students from UW, WSU and Pacific University.

What makes the Asheville program so special: In Asheville, the classmates and faculty become your family. Especially for someone like me who came from out of state, I immediately felt at home in Asheville due to the friends I made in the Asheville program.

How did the Asheville program prepare you for your current job: I went into pharmacy school having no idea what ambulatory care pharmacy even was, but the strong inpatient, community, and ambulatory care opportunities in Asheville helped me to choose which path in pharmacy I wanted to take. The faculty/preceptors in Asheville are great mentors that have provided support and advice even to this day.

What makes the Asheville program so special: The smaller class size makes going to class almost feel like you’re part of a big family. You are able to have a close connection with the other students as well as the awesome faculty which help guide you through even the most difficult parts of pharmacy.


Trish Mashburn

Trish_MashburnHometown: Franklin, NC

Graduation date/degree earned: Pharm.D., 2015

Current place of employment/job role: Postdoctoral Research Associate, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy

Why did you choose to study pharmacy in Asheville: I wanted to remain close to home (Western NC)

How did the Asheville program prepare you for your current job: Both my current job and my previous job were directly related to my time on the Asheville campus. For my previous job as a Director of Clinical Services and community pharmacist at an independent pharmacy, I had the opportunity to have rotated there as a student during my fourth year of pharmacy school. The owner, seeing my interest and skills in Medication Therapy Management (MTM), later hired me to focus on the pharmacy’s clinical services. Thus practice experiences through the Asheville program, can lead to connections and job opportunities in Asheville and the surrounding areas. After four years in that position and seeking a career change, I reached out to Dr. Mollie Scott, the regional associate dean at Asheville, as a mentor and advisor. While meeting with her, she encouraged me and also happened to mention a postdoctoral research fellowship position opening on the Asheville campus with Dr. Lesha Carpenter. Dr. Carpenter’s research focuses on rural pharmacy practice as well as the opioid epidemic, both areas with which I had experience and professional interest. When pursuing this 2-year position, I had the support of Asheville faculty who wrote recommendation letters on my behalf. So again, experiences and relationships with the Asheville program continued beyond graduation and connected me to great job opportunities.

What makes the Asheville program so special: Firstly, you cannot live in Asheville and not be changed by it. The Asheville area is stunning and the food and culture is immensely fun. Secondly, Asheville has a history of progressive and innovative pharmacy practice and as such, has a wealth of insight and opportunities for student pharmacists. Lastly, as a member of the first class on the Asheville campus, I can attest that the Asheville faculty and staff are indeed exceptional. They were handpicked to establish the campus in Asheville and they each devoted all of the love and hard work one would expect to help something beautiful grow. Because the Asheville campus is uniquely small, it is close knit and it is strong. You cannot get this experience anywhere else and you most certainly won’t forget it!

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Mountain Area Health Education Center

Mountain Area Health Education Center (MAHEC) is based in Asheville and is the largest Area Health Education Center (AHEC) in the North Carolina system. All MAHEC clinics use the embedded pharmacist model where pharmacists are credentialed as Clinical Pharmacist Practitioners to initiate and adjust medications under North Carolina’s Collaborative Practice Act. Pharmacists provide direct patient care in the following areas: comprehensive medication management, annual wellness visits, anticoagulation management, diabetes and gestational diabetes, osteoporosis, Hepatitis C, and medication assisted treatment for substance use disorder.

Learn More Download the Brochure

 


 

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Mission Health

Mission Health operates operates six hospitals; numerous outpatient and surgery centers; a post-acute care provider, CarePartners; a long-term acute care provider, Asheville Specialty Hospital; and the region’s only dedicated Level II trauma center. And with more than 10,500 dedicated colleagues, Mission Health is capable and committed to improving the health and wellness of the people of Western North Carolina. Mission Health is based in Asheville, N.C., and is the state’s sixth largest health system. For six of the past eight years, Mission Health has been named one of the nation’s Top 15 Health Systems by IBM Watson Health—and we’re the only health system in North Carolina to achieve this recognition.

Learn More

 


 

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Charles George VA Medical Center

The Charles George VA Medical Center honors Veterans by providing exceptional health care that improves their health and well-being. This care will be delivered by engaged, collaborative teams in an integrated environment that supports learning, discovery and continuous improvement. It will emphasize prevention and population health and contribute to the nation’s well-being through education, research and service in National emergencies. In addition to the main facility in Asheville, NC, services are offered at community-based outpatient clinics in the region.

Learn More

 


 

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Asheville Buncombe Community Christian Ministry

The Asheville Buncombe Community Christian Ministry (ABCCM) provides urgent care, medication assistance, and crisis dental care to nearly 4,000 Buncombe County adults between 18-65. Those patients—many of whom are working two or more jobs to make ends meet—are deeply grateful for these services. Students and faculty from Pharmacy, Nursing and Medicine join together to staff the monthly “Team Night” free clinic and afterwards share a meal to socialize and reflect on the experience.

Learn More

 


Asheville Campus

Karpen Hall Exterior

Karpen Hall Lab

Karpen 011 – Classroom


Learn more about Living in Asheville:

How do I select a campus for my PY2-PY4 years?

It is about finding a good fit for you. Things to consider when selecting a campus: Career goals, leadership opportunities, class size/learning environment, and community.

When is the deadline to select a campus?

The Early Decision Deadline is October 15th of the PY1 year, and the Regular Decision Deadline is February 15th of the PY1 year.

When does the application open?

The application will open on October 6th, 2020.

What is the benefit of applying Early Decision?

Students who select Asheville by the Early Decision Deadline, are guaranteed to have their first immersion experience in Asheville.

Can I visit the Asheville Campus before making my decision?

Yes, we offer tours of the campus and meetings in person and via zoom. Please email ESOP1+3@unc.edu to schedule.

Do I have to be in the Ambulatory Care Pathway or the Rural Health Scholar program in order to select Asheville as my campus for my PY2-PY4 years?

No, you do not have to participate in either pathway/program to attend the Asheville Campus. However, only Asheville Campus students can participate in those pathways/programs.

Do I need to apply to participate in the Ambulatory Care Pathway?

Yes, a simple application process, which includes a statement of interest and a brief interview. Once you select your campus preference as AVL, you will be given the opportunity to indicate your intention to apply to the pathway.

Is there a limit on the number of applicants that will be accepted?

No, at this time there is no limit.

What benefit is there to being a part of the Ambulatory Care Pathway?

The Ambulatory Care Pathway Program was established to create a workforce of pharmacy leaders in outpatient pharmacy practice with exceptional skills in creating and expanding ambulatory care services. Differentiate yourself by developing the necessary skills to develop new outpatient clinical pharmacy services.

How do I apply to be a Rural Health Scholar?

Yes, a simple application process, which includes a statement of interest and a brief interview. Once you select your campus preference as AVL, you will be given the opportunity to indicate your intention to apply to the pathway.

Is there a limit on the number of applicants that will be accepted?

Currently, we can accommodate up to 10 Rural Scholars. Our capacity is limited by the availability of sites and preceptors.

Am I required to practice in a rural community when I graduate with the Rural Pharmacy Health Certificate?

No, there are no post-graduate requirements associated with the completion of the certificate. Each year, we do have several Rural Scholars that successfully pursue post-grad residency, fellowships and careers that align well with serving rural and underserved populations.

Are there scholarships associated with being a Rural Scholar?

Yes, once you are selected as a Rural Scholar, you may apply for a scholarship focused specifically to support those pursuing a training path with rural focus.

What benefit is there to receiving a Rural Pharmacy Health Certificate when I graduate?

The Rural Pharmacy Health Certificate program is a focused program of study that prepares student pharmacists for collaborative, interprofessional practices that serve the health care needs of those living in rural and small communities. This concentration within the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree is ideal for individuals who want to live and practice in rural areas and provide care for underserved patient populations.

How do I apply for RASP?

Students on both campuses can participate in RASP. In Fall of the PY2 year there is a formal process where students review available projects and get matched with a faculty mentor.

What is the benefit of participating in RASP?

Students that complete the RASP pathway will design and complete a faculty mentored research project over 3 semesters. Student that complete the RASP pathway will be eligible to graduate with University Honors and have a final manuscript that is suitable for publication in a scholarly journal.

Would my RASP mentor be based in Asheville?

It really depends on your interests. RASP mentors can accept students from either campus, but some projects may be limited to one campus or the other. Several faculty members in Asheville sponsor RASP projects related to clinical practice and health outcomes. If you are interested in doing benchtop research, then the Chapel Hill campus may be a better fit for you. Here are some examples of recent RASP projects from Asheville.

  • Developing and Evaluating Simulated Patient Scenarios in Order to Teach Suicide Prevention Communication Skills to Student Pharmacists
  • Evaluation of transparency and quality of provider networks related to mental health conditions in individual and marketplace insurance in North Carolina
  • Exploring the Feasibility of Implementing a Medication Assisted Therapy Program through the Emergency Department
  • Cracking the Code: An Analysis of Emergency Drug Cart Medication Stocking Practices in Hospitals Throughout North Carolina
  • Opioid Use Disorder Treatment Continuation Among Postpartum Women in the Appalachian Region of North Carolina

What student organizations can I get involved with in Asheville?

There are several organizations with formal chapters on the Asheville campus.

Beyond Clinic Walls, Recruitment Ambassadors, Kappa Epsilon (KE), Student National Pharmaceutical Association (SNPhA), Carolina Association of Pharmacy Students (CAPS), Asheville Executive Committee, Rho Chi Honor Society, Phi Lambda Sigma (PLS), Student College of Clinical Pharmacy (SCCP), College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP),Global Engagement Organization (GEO), Christian Pharmacy Fellowship International (CPFI) and Industry Pharmacists Organization (IPhO).

Please note that PLS membership is based on peer and faculty nominations as well as an interview process. Additionally, each Rho Chi class is inducted during the PY2 spring semester based off cumulative GPA.

Many organizations offer opportunities for participation on both campuses.

Are there other leadership opportunities?

Class Officers: Class officers can be elected from either campus. However, the Asheville Representative for each class can only be elected from Asheville.

The Asheville Summit is a student-run conference in the Spring that draws pharmacy students and pharmacists from around the country (and a few from Australia). The chair of the Asheville Summit is selected through an application process each year.

What if I join a student organization that is not in Asheville?

If you are interested in a student organization that is not currently offered in Asheville, we recommend that you discuss opportunities for involvement with the student leaders.

1. Will all of my classes be taught from Chapel Hill?

No, many courses originate from the Asheville Campus. Upper-level courses will have Asheville based faculty that serve as case experts. All courses that have group work or simulations will have local course facilitators for students in Asheville.

2. Will there be interprofessional experiences in Asheville?

Yes, Asheville is also home to a satellite campus for both the UNC School of Medicine, The UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and nursing programs from the area.

Students and faculty from these programs work together to support a monthly free clinic for the community and engage in after clinic meals to socialize and reflect on the experience.

Additional opportunities exist in the co-curricular space. ABCCM team night is an interprofessional clinic experience where students and faculty volunteer. ABCCM is a free clinic serving the uninsured of Buncombe County. Another co-curricular experience is Beyond Clinic Walls, a student-led interprofessional initiative focusing on learning about and from patients related to their health and social needs.

There are also experiential, community-based experiences offered at least twice a year in Western NC. UNC Health Sciences at MAHEC, in collaboration with the Office of Rural Health Initiatives, offers longitudinal education for interprofessional teams.

  • Students work in teams to address community health needs while also receiving their clinical training within that community. This unique experience weaves together the opportunities and challenges of addressing the social determinants of health.
  • Pharmacy students in Asheville have access to all of UNCA’s campus amenities including:
  • UNCA’s library and study spaces
  • UNCA’s gym, track, pool, and other recreation spaces indoors and outdoors
  • UNCA’s intramural and other organized recreational activities
  • UNCA’s dining facilities throughout campus
  • More information can be found at: https://www.unca.edu/
  • All students in Asheville are connected to the UNC network and can utilize the IT help desk resources through UNC’s website.
  • We also maintain a direct VTC connection to a member of the IT team in Chapel Hill to assist Asheville students with IT questions.
  • No, students pay the same tuition and fees regardless of their campus selection.
  • Yes, students in Asheville are on the same fiber optic and wireless network as the Chapel Hill campus. Access to online HSL resources is identical. Students in Asheville also have access to UNCA’s library resources.

What health resources do I have access to on the Asheville Campus?

Students have access to UNC Asheville’s Health and Wellness Center, which includes primary care, immunizations, TB tests, sick visits, and counseling.

Students also have access to 100s of providers in the Asheville area for their primary care needs.

Can I park on campus?

Yes, students can purchase a UNCA parking pass and park in non-resident lots.

What do I do if I need help with my computer?

Is there any difference in tuition between attending the PharmD program on the Asheville campus or the Chapel Hill campus?

Do students on the AVL campus have access to the health science library in Chapel Hill?

What outdoor activities are there in Asheville?

Asheville has an abundance of hiking trails:

i. https://www.blueridgeparkway.org/

ii. ashevilletrails.com/waterfalls-near-asheville-nc/

Other outdoor activities include tubing, rafting, climbing, kayaking, the gardens at the Biltmore Estate, the NC Arboretum, among others: https://www.romanticasheville.com/outdoors.html

What do you do for fun in Asheville?

Asheville is home to many unique dining and entertainment experiences:

Students also have access to activities and entertainment through UNC Asheville, such as intramural sports and clubs.

What are the housing options?

Asheville has many great apartment complexes (many brand new) that you can view here: https://www.apartments.com/asheville-nc/

We also recommend joining the Eshelman School of Pharmacy Asheville Facebook page for leads on apartments, houses, and roommates.

Students can utilize on-campus housing at UNC Asheville

What public transit resources are available in Asheville?

Students can use the Asheville bus system for free with their OneCard: https://www.ashevillenc.gov/department/transit/

Are there part-time work opportunities in Asheville?

Yes, there are numerous opportunities for part-time employment at community and hospital pharmacies in Asheville.

 

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